Institute

The Alan Turing Institute Almere (ATIA) is a research institute specialized in the analysis of medical data and clinical decision support. The institute has a firm background in artificial intelligence and an aim for early diagnostics and cost-efficiency.

The institute was founded in 2009 to develop advanced knowledge based systems to integrate multidisciplinary - and seemingly unrelated - health research results (information) in order to personalize diagnosis and treatment of patients and to help prevent disease development. These systems are based on innovative artificial intelligence (AI) and agent technology. ATIA's focus in the healthcare domain is on female sexual dysfunction (FSD), obesity and cognitive capacity/reserve and related dysfunctions such as depression.


Read  ATIA's AI factsheet here.
Read ATIA's general factsheet here.

Mission

ATIA has the ambition to contribute to the health and well-being of people.
ATIA has developed knowledge based systems that'll help scientists to formulate and test hypotheses explaining the course of a disease and its underlying mechanisms to support healthcare professionals in optimize medical care.


In particular, they must be able to predict which treatment is optimal for a particular patient, as well as an individual's risk of developing a certain disease and indicate how to prevent that disease. To this end, ATIA is developing innovative technology based on artificial intelligence and agent technology, to integrate multidisciplinary - and seemingly unrelated - health research results (data). These data and our scientific knowledge are modeled to allow reasoning about individuals.
In other words: We bring data to life!

Vision

Healthcare professionals face the challenge to provide services that are not only high in quality, but also readily accessible and affordable. With the ATIA approach, diseases may be prevented or be diagnosed earlier and better, treatment will be personalized and more adequate. People will be able to participate in society in good health and the costs for society will decrease.

No longer are we convinced that one disease has the same single cause for every individual and that one treatment suffices, complex diseases like cancer are the result of:

  • Combined genetic factorsHealthcare professionals face the challenge to provide services that are not only high in quality, but also readily accessible and affordable. With the ATIA approach, diseases may be prevented or be diagnosed earlier and better, treatment will be personalized and more adequate. People will be able to participate in society in good health and the costs for society will decrease.

  • Toxic factors

  • Environmental factors

  • Lifestyle factors, etc. 

This calls for Personalized Medicine: having knowledge of all these factors from a particular individual and basing the diagnosis, cause and treatment on that knowledge.

Funding

The ATIA approach originates from the Emotional Brain company that had developed tools for advanced knowledge representation and reasoning. A government subsidy (Pieken in de Delta), matched by the province of Flevoland and the Almere city council (Investment Program Flevoland-Almere), signalled the start of an independent not-for-profit organization (a foundation: Stichting Valorisation Bridge). As of January 2016, ATIA is an LLC/Ltd. company (BV in Dutch). 

Paradigm shift

ATIA enables the healthcare professional to match any available patient information to scientific knowledge about the cause and effects of complex diseases and health risks. This allows for earlier and more specific diagnosis and timely and more precise treatment: Personalized Therapy. A disease in two similar patients with the same diagnosis might have very different underlying causes. Instead of treating symptoms in a one-treatment-suits-all fashion, we aim to treat the underlying cause for a particular individual. The ATIA approach leads to less unnecessary and costly research and fewer cases of trial-and-error treatment.
This paradigm shift benefits the patients as well as all stakeholders in the healthcare chain.





© 2015 Alan Turing Institute Almere